Latest Shouts In The Shoutbox -- View The Shoutbox · Rules Collapse  


Pages: (2) 1 2  ( Go to first unread post )
Add Reply
New Topic

 Investing In Your Forum
Skyon Archer
 Posted: Jun 21 2018, 10:23 AM
Quote

Keeper of the knowledge . . . all of it!
Group: Admin
Posts: 263
Joined: 20-May 18
Age: N/A
Location: On da' internets!
Status: Offline



Yes but you aren't going to sue them in court and they know it.

You can request a DMCA take down. Contact their hosting provider and specifically request it. Here's an easy to read article on how it's done.

Just to let you know, I receive about six or seven of these each month and almost all of them are investigated to not be true.

As for the copyright symbol, it's not really required.

QUOTE
The U.S. Copyright Office says an omission of copyright notice makes the copyright valid only if the work was created after March 1, 1989.


Here are . . . .

Ways to Protect Web Content Copyright:

I. Preventative Measures:

There are certain measures that can be taken to discourage plagiarism of your content by illustrating that you are aware of your rights as the content’s creator.
  • Register your website with the DMCA and add one of their badges to your website to let potential copyright infringers know that you are protecting your content
  • Include a copyright notice on your website. This will show that you are aware of your legal standing as the content’s creator. To intentional infringers, this will likely be enough to scare them away. To unintentional copiers, it should be a reminder to them that copying your content is illegal. You can also post a DO NOT COPY badge from duplicate content checking sites like PlagSpotter to warn potential plagiarists from stealing from you.
  • A way to build proof that all your content is actually yours is by actively documenting the creative process. Save drafts of everything you post online in case you need to prove later that you are the original author.

II. Use Duplicate Content Detection and Monitoring Tools:

Detecting copyright infringements and working pre-emptively against offenders can save a significant amount of time and effort, as copyright laws can become tangled and complicated.

If you own a website or blog, any and all content that you created and uploaded must be monitored against takers. The internet is full of tools that can be used in the fight against copyright infringement; here are specific tools and steps that can be taken to protect your web content:
  • Use Google Search to scan the internet for unique parts of your text. Remember to use quotation marks so that the result is most accurate to your exact wording structure! Another way to do this and save time is to set Google Alerts so that each time new work that matches those search queries is published online Google will notify you on your email.
  • Monitor your content to search for plagiarism. There are various tools that allow you to search certain text and inform you if parts of it have been used elsewhere. Plagium and Plagiarisma are two such tools. If sentences used within a site have not properly attributed you, and you are the original author, you can take the needed measures and contact the plagiarist’s website with further instructions.
  • You can also add your blog to the Copygator service, which monitors your blog for free and contacts you when it finds duplicate content on the internet. It labels the duplicate content as either ‘exact’ or ‘near’ to indicate whether the content has been identically copied or just share a resemblance or similar elements with one another.
  • Sometimes we unintentionally plagiarise, whether it’s having just read an article and copying information without meaning to or in some other way. The PlagSpotter software provides a service similar to Copygator but also allows you to scan your web content using the batch search feature (the ability to check large numbers of URLs or your whole site) to see if you have accidentally plagiarized. The program will indicate where the duplicate content in your post or website is and allow you to view your “plagiarism percentage”. This is a handy way to ensure that you won’t end up in the middle of a copyright dispute or get removed from Google’s search results.

III. Take Action After Finding a Plagiarist

After discovering that someone has taken your content, you need to undertake steps to get the situation rectified. Here are some helpful guidelines on what you should do to remedy it as soon as possible.
  • Gather as much information at you can to prove that you are that content’s original author. Take screenshots if possible.
  • Locate the copyright infringer’s contact information. If you cannot find their information, try contacting webmasters@(whatever the domain name is). You should send a polite email specifiying that the content on their website is yours and is being used without your permission. Ask them to cease and desist and include all gathered information to show that you have evidence. In most cases the plagiarist will remove the stolen content after the first email.
  • A Whosis service can be used to find the website owner’s legal name and phone number. All you have to do is insert the domain name in the search box and their name should appear. From here, you can contact them in a cordial way and ask for the content to be removed.
  • If your dialog with the offender has not been fruitful, you can contact their website’s hosting company. They can also be found using a Whois service. Tell them about the situation and that the person in question is using your material without permission. They may remove the subscriber.
  • If you are still not getting any results, send the copyright offender an official “Cease and Desist” letter. With this, you can formally notify them that they must remove your content from their webpage or face impending legal action. There are many sample “Cease and Desist” letters online to help you draft one that screams “authority.”
  • The DMCA’s Section 512 provides “notice and takedown” procedures that give copyright holders an easy way to cut off access to content that infringes on their copyright.
  • File a copyright complaint with Google. They may remove or disable the infringing content or terminate the subscribers. The form to report such activity and more information on Google’s policy and how it relates to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act can be found here.
  • At the end, suing the plagiarist is always an option; however, this includes time and expenses, not to mention stress. It would be recommended to exhaust all other avenues before attempting a lawsuit.
PMWebsite
^
Dazzal
 Posted: Jun 21 2018, 11:07 AM
Quote

Friends
Group: Friends
Posts: 25
Joined: 18-June 18
Age: N/A
Location: Western US
Status: Offline



Thanks for the information Skyon. All I can say is UGH!

I just went ahead and added to the bottom of my board what Spice suggested and changed the wording a little bit. May or may not help.
PMEmailWebsite
^
Spice
 Posted: Yesterday at 09:41 am
Quote

Friends
Group: Admin
Posts: 693
Joined: 20-May 18
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Status: Offline



QUOTE (Dazzal @ Jun 21 2018, 08:17 AM)
QUOTE (Spice @ Jun 21 2018, 07:54 AM)
Sadly there isn't much you can do about it Dazzal. I think I saw a post on the support board about a situation similar to yours. Proboards stance is basically tough luck.

You could put something like this on your forum:
Copyright © name of forum and year
All graphics and content are property of name of forum with the exception of content from individual member posts.
Copying or reproducing any content, without explicit permission from rightful owner, is prohibited.
Please obey the rules.

________________

I agree Spice, there isn't anything I can do about it. I have it in my GUIDELINES, but many don't even read them. I like your suggestion though. I added it at the bottom of my board and changed the wording a bit. May or may not help but thanks!!!

You're welcome. I know a few forums where the owners make their own themes have that on their forum. Whether or not it works, I don't know, but it may be a deterrent.
PMEmail
^
Dazzal
 Posted: Yesterday at 10:11 am
Quote

Friends
Group: Friends
Posts: 25
Joined: 18-June 18
Age: N/A
Location: Western US
Status: Offline



QUOTE (Spice @ Jun 22 2018, 07:41 AM)
QUOTE (Dazzal @ Jun 21 2018, 08:17 AM)
QUOTE (Spice @ Jun 21 2018, 07:54 AM)
Sadly there isn't much you can do about it Dazzal. I think I saw a post on the support board about a situation similar to yours. Proboards stance is basically tough luck.

You could put something like this on your forum:
Copyright © name of forum and year
All graphics and content are property of name of forum with the exception of content from individual member posts.
Copying or reproducing any content, without explicit permission from rightful owner, is prohibited.
Please obey the rules.

________________

I agree Spice, there isn't anything I can do about it. I have it in my GUIDELINES, but many don't even read them. I like your suggestion though. I added it at the bottom of my board and changed the wording a bit. May or may not help but thanks!!!

You're welcome. I know a few forums where the owners make their own themes have that on their forum. Whether or not it works, I don't know, but it may be a deterrent.

____________________

I hope it is. ;)
PMEmailWebsite
^
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

Topic Options
Pages: (2) 1 2 
Add Reply
New Topic